Category Archives: Inlush (en)

Many countries, many conlangs

Some days ago, I started to translate the names of every single country in the world to four of my conlangs. It was rather a hard task… and a long one, there are so many countries out there! Nonetheless, it was a really interesting translation exercise. I also decided to include the names of the continental landmasses, some territories in dispute as well as the word for Earth itself. A full toponyms guide for alternative-word journalists 😉

I chose four conlangs which different ways o dealing with country names. The first one is Efenol. It’s based on Spanish, and so are its toponyms. However, many of them have been modified so much that it’s hard to recognize them (like Wân which bears little resemblance with “Uganda”). The second one is Inlush which, just as the former, is also based on an actual language (English), but sometimes with hardly recognizable results (who would say that Vanatu would end up being Fanwetó?). Then it comes Romanice. It’s a clearly Romance-based conlang and most toponyms are similar to those of other languages (Corea del Sur is also Spanish for South Korea, whereas Istati Uniti is almost Italian for US). The last conlang I chose is Tengoko, a mainly a priori language. Most Tengoko toponyms are based on the pronunciation of the name in the local language, with some exceptions such as Nuyem-Ryan’gek (Union Kingdom) for the United Kingdom.

(The list is after the read more tag)

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Not-so-plain English

More or less a month ago I read something about the Northern Cities’ Vowel Shift (NCVS), a chain change which accounts for the differences in vowel inventories between English dialects of the Great Lakes region (the US side, actually) and General American. It was interesting  and I had the idea of making an Inlush dialect based on it (Inlush is an English-based conlang by me).

However, I didn’t work on it until last Monday. NCVS proved to be evcn more interesting than what I had expected and I ended up with a conlang whose grammar was similar to that of Inlush, but greatly differing as far as phonology and orthography are concerned. The result was different enough from Inlush so as to be considered a language on its own, so I dropped its original name Inlish (which comes from English very much like Inlush) in favor of a more distinct one: Narçer /ˈnæɹt͡sɚ/, which comes from Northern. However, while its phonology is definitely based on that of Northern Inland American English, other aspects of this conlang may be closer to other English varieties.

The following table shows how both Inlush and Narçer deal with actual English vowels:

ENGLISH

INLUSH

NARÇER

bad

/bæd/

bad

/bæð/

bied

/bjeð/

pass

/pæs/

pas

/pæs/

pies

/pjes/

father

/ˈfɑːðɚ/

fade

/ˈfæðə/

fazer

/ˈfæzɚ/

not

/nɑt/

no

/no/

na

/næ/

loss

/lɔs/

los

/los/

las

/læs/

law

/lɔ/

lo

/lo/

la

/læ/

about

/əˈbæʊt/

ebot

/əˈβot/

evót

/ˈɘvot/

spotted

/ˈspɑtɪ̈d/

spotut

/ˈspoɾɜt/

ispaŧid

/ɜsˈpæɾɜt/

sit

/sɪt/

sut

/sʌt/

sit

/sɜt/

city

/ˈsɪti/

suru

/ˈsʌɹʌ/

siŧi

/ˈsɜɾɜ/

see

/siː/

shi

/ʃi/

xí

/çi/

date

/deɪt/

dait

/daɪt/

daat

/dæːt/

bed

/bɛd/

béd

/bɛð/

bäd

/bäð/

burn

/bɜːɹn/

been

/bəːn/

bern

/bɚn/

winner

/ˈwɪnɚ/

vune

/ˈvʌnə/

winer

/ˈwɜnɚ/

run

/ɹʌn/

ren

/ɹən/

ron

/ɹɔn/

put

/pʊt/

pót

/put/

put

/put/

through

/θɹu/

tró

/tɹu/

sru

/sɹu/

mute

/mjuːt/

myet

/mjət/

miut

/mjut/

my

/maɪ/

mei

/meɪ/

më

/meː/

boy

/bɔɪ/

boi

/boɪ/

bii

/bɜː/

soul

/soʊl/

sól

/sul/

suul

/suːl/

trout

/tɹaʊt/

trot

/tɹot/

trót

/tɹot/

arm

/ɑɹm/

aam

/æːm/

arm

/æɹm/

here

/hɪɹ/

hie

/ˈhiə/

hir

/hɜɹ/

bear

/bɛɚ/

bée

/ˈbeə/

bär

/bäɹ/

port

/pɔːɹt/

poet

/pɔə̯t/

port

/pɔɹt/

tour

/tʊəɹ/

tóe

/ˈtuə/

tur

/tuɹ/

pure

/pjʊɚ/

piee

/ˈpiəː/

piur

/pjuɹ/

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