Mizugana – Writing Mizuyu with Kana and Hangul

Last week, I introduced Mizuyu, my latest conlang. While its native script would consist of slightly modified Chinese characters and a native syllabary, it is possible to replace that syllabary with a mix of Katakana and Hiragana (Japanese moraic scripts collectively known as Kana).

As the phonologies of the Mizuyu varieties which may use Kana (Northern, Southern and Classical) and Japanese differ, these scripts had to be adapted. One of the most important changes is that while there is a Hiragana and a Katakana character for each syllable in Japanese (using one or another depends on factors other than pronunciation), they stand for different sounds in Mizuyu. For example, り (Hiragana ri) stands for li in Northern Mizuyu while リ (the same syllable in Katakana) becomes ri (a different Mizuyu syllable).

On the other hand, Damlé Mýný (another Mizuyu dialect which may be considered a language on its own) employs Hangul instead of the Kana. A number of modifications were also necessary to adapt this Korean alphabet to Swams (another name for Damlé Mýný).

Image #1 show Kana characters used for Classical Mizuyu (Misuŋyu Gäden):

Note: The sixth character, , is an otherwise mute character that geminates the following consonant: サは = sapa, サヽは = sappa isn’t used for double Ntenna is てんな, not *てヽな.

Image #2 depicts Northern Mizuyu (Davimizuyu) Kana table which is considerably larger due to its larger phonetic inventory:


Once again, is used to geminate consonants other than N.

On the other hand, Southern Mizuyu (Kigamishui) Kana table is shorter.


Note:
Apart from which is used as in other Mizuyu varieties, the character ー lengthens the previous vowel: とー = . This usage differs from the previous Mizuyu dialects where long vowels are indicated by a CV+V sequence: too = とお (to + o). The character ー is not to be confused with 一, the almost identical Hanzi characater for ‘one’.  ー (the lengthening mark) is written as a vertical line in vertical writing.

Image #4 depicts Korean Hangul characters as used for Damlé Mýný or ‘Swams’, yet another Mizuyu dialect:


The first thing to know about this Hangul implementation (as well as nearly any other) is that characters are grouped into syllablic blocks. To know more about this, read the Wikipedia article on Hangul.

I faced a problem while adapting this script to Swams: the number of consonant letters was smaller than what I needed. The solution I worked out isn’t very elegant but at least works (and affects only a small number of letters): there are two forms for each vowel, one used with most consonants and another for the three “modified” consonants (in red). Then, the difference between fa and ha isn’t reflected by a change in the consonant letter as one could expect but by changing the vowel instead.

The first column in the image (Vowels) has two characters for each vowel, the first one with the usual form and the second one with the form used for modified consonants (, F and ). Notice that in Hangul all syllable blocks must have a consonant (using the circle-like mute consonant for vowels not preceded by other phonemes).

The columns in the middle (Consonants) has two syllables for each consonant, one with the vowel i (a vertical line) and another with y (a horizontal line), so as to show both a wide and a tall form for each character.

Unlike Korean, Damlé-Mýný has a relatively complex system of tones, which are indicated as final pseudo-consonants. The characters for high, raising and falling tones are identical to those of the consonants K, S and R. However, this poses no problem as final K, S or R aren’t allowed in Swams phonology.

An example sentence: We are humans and we are from Earth.

Classical Mizuyu (Misuŋyu Gäden):

我社ト人类だそ土星ど。 (Chinese characters + Kana)
のシト   カレだ   そ   トそノど。 (Kana)
Näsya tä  kärei da sä thäsäng dä.
/nɒsjá tə kɒ́ɹeɪ̯ da tʰɒˈsɒ́ŋ dɒ/

Northern Mizuyu (Davimizuyu):

我しゃと人りいだロ土星どだ。 (Chinese characters + Kana)
のしゃと   コりい   だ   てぞノ   ど   だ。 (Kana)
Nośat holii da ro tozong do da.
/ˈnoʃʌt ˈholiː də ro ‘tozoŋ do’ʌ/

Southern Mizuyu (Kigamishui):

我社と人类だせ土星どだ。 (Chinese characters + Kana)
ねしゃ   と   これい   だ   セ   とすん   ど   だ。 (Kana)
Nesha to korei da se toson do da.
/néʃá’tó kóɾ’é.i ðá se ‘tósón ðo’ðá/

Swams (Damlé Mýný):

너싸人칫사썽土星섯사。(Chinese characters + Hangul)
너싸  컥칫  사  썽  떠섲  섯사。 (Hangul)
Nexa gélî sa xè theseng sêsa.
/neʃa gélǐ sa ʃè tʰeseŋ sěsa/

This is all so far… or almost all of it 🙂 The tables I posted above as images may look nice but characters can’t be copied and pasted somewhere else, so I’m posting these (uglier ¬¬) ones as well:

Classical
A I U Ä E
A I U Ä E
Q
G
PH
M
P N
B
Ŋ
TH
S
T Ŕ
D
R
KH
Y

K W


Northern
A I U O E
A I U O E
P
N
B
Ŋ
F
S
V

Z
T
Ś しゃ しゅ しょ しョ
D
Ź じゃ じゅ じょ じョ
Þ
C ちゃ ちゅ ちょ ちョ
Ð

J ぢゃ ぢゅ ぢょ ぢョ
K L
G
R
H Y

M
W

Southern
A I U O E
A I O U E
M
P
N
B
S
T
SH しゃ
しょ しョ
D
CH ちゃ
ちょ ちョ
K
R
G

Ł
Q
Y


H
W



Swams:

Vowels Consonants Tones


이으 K 기그 M 미므


A 아야 P 비브 KH 끼끄 N 니느 Mid: a
E 어여 PH 삐쁘 G 키크 Ŋ 지즈 High: á
I 이애 B 피프 애우 X 씨쓰 Low: à
U 오유 T 디드 F 해후 R 라르 Rising: â
Y 으우 TH 띠뜨 S 시스 L 치츠 Falling: ä


D 티트 H 히흐 래루


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Posted on 2012/02/17, in Damlé Mýný (en), English, Mizuyu (en), Scripts. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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