Lindavor: Yet another conlang!

No number of languages seems to be enough for a conlanger like me! Now, I’m at only one step of reaching the 40-conlangs milestone. Quite a lot, isn’t it? When I was beginning to thoink I would stick with the same number of conlangs for the rest of the year (at least), this new one appeared. Actually, it’s a bit of a relief, I was afraid I might be becoming less creative ;).

Everything started with a single word: medail (/me’dajl/, think of it as meh-dile). It meant metal (it had to!), and was close enough to the word metal in Romance languages and their mother language: Latin. So, I worked out which changes the Latin word metallum would have undergone so as to become medail. All which was left was just matter of working out the rest of the language (children’s play, isn’t it?).

It also draws some influence of Alinna a conlang of mine which never took off. Just as Alinna (R.I.P.), Lindavor is not a typical romlang (a Romance-languages-like conlang) as Romanice is, but a language base in earlier stages of Latin. For example, it conserves grammatical cases, a feature long lost in all Romance language with the exception of Romanian (and Aromanian).

Along with this new language, I made a conscript for it. It’s called Alaved (which literally means “alphabet”, not a very creative name, I know) and, as seen in the image above, it can be written in many styles (just as our own script can be written with a variety of fonts). Given that Lindavor descends from Latin, a question may arise: Why did Lindavor speakers abandon the Latin alphabet? The short answers is they never did, Alaved is actually an evolution of ancient Roman cursive. Some of it’s letters were influenced by the Greek alphabet, however. For some reason, I think it has an Armenian-ish look, but that’s just coincidental.

The very first word in the image (the one in bold-like letters) is Lindavor, the conlang’s name:

Lindavor /lin.da’voɾ/

Etymologically, it means “Our language”. This can give you an idea of the stages between Classical Latin and Lindavor itself:

LINGVA NOSTRA → *Limbwa-nothra /ˌlim.bwa’noθ.θɾa/ → *Limba-north /lim.ba’noɾθ/ →*Linambor → Lindavor

That evolution is only true for the language’s name, otherwise “our language” becomes lib north.

On the upper right, the word Alaved /ˌa.la’ved/ (alphabet, also the name of the script) is written (with frankly horrible letterforms).

And, below that, there is the same phrase I translated to my other conlangs: A star shines upon the hour of our meeting.

Un thêl lût san or sy konderazoin north.
/un θe:l lu:t sã or sy kõn.de.ɾa.dzojn noɾθ/
un thêl lût sa-n or sy konderazoin north
a star shines the-in hour the-GEN meeting-GEN ours.
A star shines upon the hour of our meeting.

One of the most noticeable features in that translation is the use of cases. Classical Latin made use of 7 cases. Most Romance languages don’t retain any case distictions, whereas Romanian has two cases (a nominative/acusative and genitive/dative). Lindavor is a bit more conservative in thise aspect, keeping 4 cases: nominative (verb subject), genitive (which works most often as possesive), dative (indirect object) and accusative (direct object). Here’s a comparison table between Latin congregatio (the source of “congregation”, from which Konderaiz (Lindavor for “meeting”) also comes), Lindavor konderaiz and Romainan congregație:

Latin

Lindavor

Romanian

Sg

Pl

Sg

Pl

Sg

Pl

NOM.

congregatio

congregationes

konderaiz

konderazoin

congregație

congregații

GEN.

congregationis

congregationum

konderazoin

konderazûn

congregației

congregațiilor

DAT.

gongregationi

congregationibus

konderazoin

konderazoin

congregației

congregațiilor

ACC:

gongregationem

congregationes

konderazoin

konderazoine

congregație

congregații

You may have noticed something: many word forms look exactly the same! You wouldn’t be able to tell whether konderazoin is to be translated as meetings, meeting’s, or meeting as the object of the sentence (accusative case). In order to solve those ambiguities, Lindavor relies heavily in articles (which also declinate for case, number and gender). With the aid of articles, there’s no risk of confusing sai konderazoin, sy konderazoin and sa konderazoin.

See you next time!. Ciao or, as said in Lindavor, ôl! (which, BTW, isn’t related to hallo/hello/hola but to Latin vale).

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Posted on 2011/07/23, in English, Lindavor (en). Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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